Serato DJ General Discussion

Talk about Serato DJ software and controllers

Macbook Pro with Serato DJ

Anthony Arduino 6:24 PM - 28 April, 2013
I've decided to upgrade to a MBP from a PC to run Serato DJ with but unsure of which one to purchase. There is a 300 hundred dollar price difference between the two and I was curious if anyone has some insight on the difference in performance between the two.

2.5GHz dual-core Intel Core i5
Turbo Boost up to 3.1GHz
4GB 1600MHz memory
500GB 5400-rpm hard drive1
Intel HD Graphics 4000

or

2.9GHz dual-core Intel Core i7
Turbo Boost up to 3.6GHz
8GB 1600MHz memory
750GB 5400-rpm hard drive1
Intel HD Graphics 4000

P.S. I'll only be using the laptop to run Serato DJ
phatbob 6:37 PM - 28 April, 2013
They'll both work great. The ram can be upgraded on the cheaper much for a very low price if you don't buy the ram from Apple.

If you can afford the better processor, then it's always worth having extra power for future proofing, but the cheaper one will work great.
Anthony Arduino 7:02 PM - 28 April, 2013
Yeah I just wanted to make sure that there wouldn't be any lag with the cheaper option
Ragman 10:12 PM - 28 April, 2013
If there's only a $300 difference between the two I would go with the i7. It's spec'd out pretty nicely and shouldn't need an upgrade anytime soon. If I purchased the i5, I know I would want to upgrade the ram and hdd in the near future which would get me closer to the i7 price but still having less CPU power.
DjCity 6:37 PM - 29 April, 2013
Get the i7.

If you have a choice, always get the better, stronger, faster machine.

This is for your DJ Business. Don't skimp on the brain of your equipment. Get the i7.
vboyd666 11:10 PM - 30 April, 2013
When it comes to your reputation DJing. Don't cheap out on your equipment.

Either option will work. Go for the i7 if you can afford it, more because of the 8gb of ram spec than the processor. In my opinion.
BalticBeach 11:52 AM - 26 May, 2013
8GB and an SSD.....cpu speed won't matter much.

Why people still buy laptops with magnetic hard drives is baffling.
BOOGIEFROMCUR 2:16 AM - 30 September, 2013
Get the i7 if you can afford it and immediately change the harddrive for a SSD (encase your original hard drive in a usb 3 external case to be used as a backup harddrive)....If you can then afford it put 16GB ram throw out the optical bay and put another SSD...you will have a monster machine.
Check the OWC website before you decide.
arielfm22 8:30 AM - 30 September, 2013
Anthony, couple of weeks ago I was in the same boat as you. I was looking and reviewing which MBP model should I get to replace my 5 years old PC - Asus (high end) gaming laptop for DJing then I decided I'll go for MBP i7 2.9ghz with 8GB ram and 750GB HDD. I tell you it's waaaayyy better than my PC laptop though I haven't replaced my dvd drive to SSD HD yet. Some people here said... Once you go on MAC you'll never look back.

You can't go wrong with those specs you've mentioned to run Serato DJ. It's up to your budget. So, go now and put MBP to your cart :)
Scott S 12:56 AM - 1 October, 2013
I would also recommend the i7 machine. Personally I always think getting the best laptop you can is the best way to go. It is the best way to future proof yourself and gives you the best work laptop you can get (provided you DJ for a job).

If Djing is part of your income, I would make sure you have the best equipment you can get. You will find your income will pay off the difference of computers in no time.

Cheers
DJ sneakypete 1:54 AM - 24 April, 2014
I have a 2007 mac book with 4GB and 2.2ghz will that work on serato dj 1.6.2
Scott S 2:05 AM - 24 April, 2014
Quote:
I have a 2007 mac book with 4GB and 2.2ghz will that work on serato dj 1.6.2

Is it a Core 2 Duo processor? What operating system is it running?

If it meets our minimum specs, then yes it will work > serato.com

However, I can not guarantee high performance for computers that just meet the minimum specifications as they are just that, the minimum.

Regards
DJ sneakypete 2:13 AM - 24 April, 2014
Yes it is a dual core processor