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Ipod DJing for $10,000 per gig

DJ Benny B NYC 5:51 PM - 17 November, 2009
100 points to anyone who smacks one of the people mentioned in this article

Invasion of the Dilettante DJs
What does it take to call oneself a DJ these days? At New York's hottest clubs and parties, socialites and celebrities are manning the turntables (er, iPods). And not everybody is happy about it.
By Haven Thompson

On a chilly night in New York’s East Village, DJ Harley Viera-Newton strides through Lit Lounge, where she is spinning tonight. Flannel-­clad, hirsute young men lean over one another to greet the 21-year-old New York University student, her slender figure poured into a black minidress, her long hair unkempt. Since she began booking gigs three years ago, Viera-Newton has signed with Elite models, starred in campaigns for Uniqlo and DKNY and become Dior Beauty’s house DJ, playing her favorite pop and punk tracks at its events and inspiring an on-the-go makeup palette clutch. “I’ll do some crazy event uptown for Dior, in a gown, overlooking Central Park,” she says in her charmingly ambiguous accent (the daughter of a record exec and a Brazilian model, she grew up in London, then moved to L.A. at age 10). “And the next day I’ll be here with all my friends. It’s a fun mix.”

Viera-Newton is part of a youth tide hitting the turntables of Manhattan, armed with style, social cachet and, ideally, a modicum of musical taste. DJing—and the visibility that goes with it—has replaced handbag designing as the go-to profession for It girls and boys. The flock of hobbyist DJs for hire includes A-list models Jessica Stam and Agyness Deyn, actor Leo Fitzpatrick, artist Nate Lowman and rock-royalty spawn Alexandra Richards. They work fashion shows and store openings and have residencies, or regular gigs, at nightclubs—often based on the fact that a promotable name brings press and the right crowd to a venue.

Unsurprisingly, New York’s more venerable DJs are not pleased with the influx of pretty-young-thing competitors. Until recently the field had a high barrier to entry: DJs had to buy expensive turntables, amass a huge record collection and spend years learning sophisticated scratch-and-mix techniques. But now anyone with a laptop or an iPod can download hundreds of songs in minutes and “spin” a set with a mere click of a button. “Being a DJ used to take a lot of dedication—now all it requires is a little computer savvy,” says Jahi Sundance, 30, who began DJing in New York 15 years ago. Adds fellow full-time DJ Jesse Felluss, 31, “Do I think there is animosity there? Absolutely. It’s good for filling the crowd to have names, but the party suffers because they aren’t as good as guys who do this for a living.”

But backlash from the professional community clearly hasn’t lessened the appetite for this new strain of DJ. Mandie Erickson, director of public relations firm Seventh House, has hired Deyn and fashion designer Benjamin Cho, among others, to spin at her clients’ events. Part of the attraction, she says, is proximity to gossip-column fixtures. “We’re all voyeurs—everyone wants to get into someone’s head, and music is such a personal way [to do that],” says Erickson. “You realize that they love the Smiths like you love the Smiths.” Even more valuable may be the DJ’s pals: Samantha Ronson’s fees spiked to more than $25,000 after Lindsay Lohan started accompanying her to gigs (a source says that Ronson’s rate has dropped to $15,000 postbreakup).

From left: Nate Lowman; Agyness Deyn.

For the past year, Richards, 23, daughter of Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards, has been charging upwards of $10,000 per party (the going rate for a nonceleb DJ is between $250 and $400 for a club engagement, and about $1,000 for corporate events). “I grew up in a very musical home—it was symphony in the morning, and when I got home from school it was reggae, and then rock ’n’ roll at night,” she recalls in a gravelly voice, explaining that she’s recovering from a cold. In a restaurant near her SoHo apartment, she’s dressed in black skinny jeans and a leather jacket over a sweatshirt, nursing a double Jack Daniel’s and a bowl of butternut squash soup. (Her illness has, she triumphantly mentions, helped her finally quit smoking—though a few months later she’s sneaking cigarettes alongside the DJ booth at now defunct nightclub Mr. West.) Despite her success—events for Audi and Hugo Boss, residencies at nightclubs—Richards insists DJing is a sideline. “I’m considered a model, you know, to me at least,” she muses, noting that she paints and is working on a jewelry line. “I [DJ] for fun.” Unlike most hobbyists, however, she uses Serato, a program favored by serious DJs that connects a laptop to turntables, mimicking the feel of spinning with vinyl records.

Richards is honing her new skills with a little help. Her manager is Rachid Kallamni, 25, who, after working as a nightlife promoter, started his own company, Rachid Kallamni Management (RKM), to capitalize on the demand for stylish young DJs. Most of the talent he represents are under age 25; his roster includes Chris Jones, son of Foreigner guitarist Mick Jones; Jamie Biden, nephew of Vice President Joe Biden; Artem Emelianov, a Latvian-born male model with razor-sharp cheekbones; and Kallamni’s childhood friend Nick Cohen, who launched a line of “shoewelry” (sneakers laced up with gold chains). Cohen is tiring of his grueling schedule—he often has four gigs a week and is scheduled to fly to Moscow with Richards to spin at Fashion Week there—but DJing has been a boon to his shoe business. “Nightclubs are the best places to meet people,” he says.

Kallamni uses his connections to land his DJs at exclusive Manhattan venues—1OAK, Avenue, Southside, Butter, GoldBar—and provide a support system for them. “Rachid’s guys actually would come with me to an event and make sure that I was working [Serato] correctly,” Richards says. A fellow RKM talent, DJ Equal, gave her private lessons.

Another neophyte, Hallie Meyers-Shyer, daughter of romantic-comedy director Nancy Meyers and screenwriter Charles Shyer, and an aspiring writer herself, is less preoccupied with the technical aspects of the trade. “When they ask us to DJ, it’s, like, to bring a certain amount of people and a certain kind of crowd,” the baby-faced 22-year-old blond says, taking a sip of her drink on a Thursday night at the SubMercer in SoHo. Behind her, two white iPods glisten unattended on the turntables as “Someone Great” by LCD Soundsystem blares. A foot from the booth, Gossip Girl star Chace Crawford perches on an ottoman, chatting with a raven-haired publicist. “I’m not a DJ by profession; I just want to do it as a hobby, for fun,” Meyers-Shyer explains. “I don’t want to discredit that a lot of people do this as their job.” She adds with a sly smile, “It all comes out as the same thing, really.”

From left: Matt Creed; Samantha Ronson and Lindsay Lohan.

The mere existence of such amateurs is exasperating enough to the “real” DJs who are losing gigs to them. So when Paper magazine nominated Kirsten Dunst’s ex Matt Creed—whose modus operandi is alternating tracks between two iPods—for the Best DJ category in its annual nightlife awards, the nod irked many. “My DJ friends were all really upset,” says Kallamni, who maintains that his brood, even Richards, veers toward the side of real DJs. “I’m not trying to say [Creed’s] not a great guy, but to sit there and just press buttons—it’s not [being] an actual DJ.”

Actually, Creed doesn’t disagree. “It’s not fair,” he admits, adding with a defensive edge in his voice, “I didn’t ask to be nominated.” On a Friday afternoon the actor and filmmaker is hanging out at downtown bistro the Smile, where he has been working on the budget for his new movie. Two years ago Creed, 26, started DJing at the Beatrice Inn (which has been closed since April due to building-code violations, much to the chagrin of the chic, celeb-heavy set that frequented it); soon the nightclub’s patrons began booking him for corporate events and benefits, occasionally for as much as $4,000. “I do feel guilty when I get paid a lot of money, showing up with two iPods,” he says. “But I love music, and my knowledge of music has gotten me to where I am now.” Creed took up DJing for the same reason many of his creative friends, including Lowman, did: the money. “It paid for one of my first short films, and it’s given me the freedom to have my days to write,” he says.

As more dilettantes turn their hobby into a paycheck (count Madonna’s boy toy Jesus Luz among them—she reportedly footed the bill for his lessons), the recession is increasing the tension between the pros and the dabblers. “You have more DJs fighting for fewer nights,” says Tim Martell, 30, a New York–based professional DJ. “It’s not how good of a musician you are; it’s how much money you can bring to the bar.” Felluss concurs: “There are a lot of guys infinitely better than these people who get paid $5,000 a night.” Nevertheless, Paul Sevigny, co-owner of the Beatrice Inn and a skilled vinyl DJ himself, hired hobbyists—even those of the iPod ilk—for his club, claiming they fit with its intimate atmosphere. “There’s not some guy 15 yards above the crowd, sending down music like the hand of God,” he says. “If there is a pause here or there, a couple seconds between a song, it sounds a little more personal.” But, Sevigny admits with a laugh, “DJs do so little to begin with. To not use records seems, you know…. Maybe you can do a little bit more.”

www.wmagazine.com
Dj-M.Bezzle 6:02 PM - 17 November, 2009
You really cant be mad at the "djs" as much as you need to be furious at the people hiring them and paying these outragous wages to do nothing....if I was approached tomarow by a soccer scout who told me i looked good in soccer shorts and wanted to pay me 10 grand even though i never played before I would take him up on it and most of you would too....and if they continued to pay me even after showing i had no talent i would never bother learning
djbigboy 6:11 PM - 17 November, 2009
yeah even in the article they mention something to the effect that they can't turn down the money, its too easy, plus they are getting VIP'd, bottle service, and doing whatever the hell they want...I suspect most djs couldn't get into these types of events if they wanted to...

But I think another real point is that the dancing customers should be the ones that walk away disappointed and talk about it....if every customer walked out of there and said "that shit was weak" and went around telling people, it would work in our favor...but instead they say "I saw super model XXX and I got to take pictures with her".

This is just a trend. I think most clubs realize that its a fad and most paying customers want a dj that can mix and put together music properly

This article actually did make me mad tho...20 years experience, mixshow, top clubs, and I am still hunting for gigs, and now I am fighting over gigs with super models and boy toys...
bill-e 6:40 PM - 17 November, 2009
Quote:
....if I was approached tomarow by a soccer scout who told me i looked good in soccer shorts and wanted to pay me 10 grand...


wait wut???
sixxx 7:07 PM - 17 November, 2009
Quote:
Quote:
....if I was approached tomarow by a soccer scout who told me i looked good in soccer shorts and wanted to pay me 10 grand...


wait wut???


hahahaha. Yeah. Bezzle makes the weirdest analogies. hahahaha
Dj-M.Bezzle 7:53 PM - 17 November, 2009
lol i have a really weird stream of conscience
cupowater 7:54 PM - 17 November, 2009
Quote:
You really cant be mad at the "djs" as much as you need to be furious at the people hiring them and paying these outragous wages to do nothing....if I was approached tomarow by a soccer scout who told me i looked good in soccer shorts and wanted to pay me 10 grand even though i never played before I would take him up on it and most of you would too....and if they continued to pay me even after showing i had no talent i would never bother learning



hahaha as weird of an analogy as it is, it makes perfect sense. A shitty situation, but i completely agree.
I just can't wait till they start just putting on someone else's mix on internal and pre-tending so sit there any mix/scratch.
DJ Benny B NYC 8:11 PM - 17 November, 2009
taking $10,000 for playing an ipod... yeah who wouldn't do that. but you still deserve to be called a hack. you're not a dj at all, more like a model or something. or an "ipod manequin" might be a better title for them.
Dj-M.Bezzle 8:12 PM - 17 November, 2009
Quote:
taking $10,000 for playing an ipod... yeah who wouldn't do that. but you still deserve to be called a hack. you're not a dj at all, more like a model or something. or an "ipod manequin" might be a better title for them.



lol whats funney is according to this article they all agree with you most seem offended at the concept of them being labeled a dj lol
freshtodeath 8:20 PM - 17 November, 2009
I know some of the DJs mentioned in the article from around my way. This exact situation has been ruining NYC for a while.
TJ the DJ 9:51 PM - 17 November, 2009
Its not just NYC... It's like a wildfire that can't be put out across the entire United States!
PVK01 10:15 PM - 17 November, 2009
Quote:
anal
PVK01 10:16 PM - 17 November, 2009
i dunno about ya'll, but if Eva Mendez is gonna be the healining DJ then I'm there ;-)
PVK01 10:17 PM - 17 November, 2009
*edit* headlining
casket hands 10:18 PM - 17 November, 2009
one of the busiest DJs I know is also the worst DJ I know but he looks like a DJ so if he promises to entertain people believe him. from talking to people at his shows, it seems like people dont notice him trainwrecking every song, its unbelievable.
Maskrider 1:07 AM - 18 November, 2009
That is quite true now everything is prefabricated to suit you needs.
Laz219 6:14 AM - 18 November, 2009
This quote stood out to me...from "a skilled vinyl DJ" (bottom of the article)
“DJs do so little to begin with. To not use records seems, you know…. Maybe you can do a little bit more.”
Culprit 7:16 AM - 18 November, 2009
Just a stab in the dark, but, they probably dont mention that these dj's are probably only djing for 45min to 1hr, and have real djs open and close. Pure promotion. I dont like it, but if your the guy opening or closing, you would accept it.
sacrilicious 9:15 PM - 18 November, 2009
"Oh, I'm glad you're here early. You're actually opening tonight. And, sorry, but I'm afraid I can't pay you--we're a little over budget because we're paying Pete Wentz $10,000. But hopefully we'll do well at the bar and I'll make it to you next week, champ. Also, you're going to have to help him with the crossfader a little bit. He's also still getting frustrated double clicking to load songs so watch out for that, too--his rider explicitly says he only cries on cue once per night and we can't afford to pay for his makeup to be reapplied mid show."
Culprit 9:16 PM - 18 November, 2009
dunno about the not getting paid part.. lol but that sounds about right.. that happend 2 u b4?
Dj-M.Bezzle 9:21 PM - 18 November, 2009
Quote:
Just a stab in the dark, but, they probably dont mention that these dj's are probably only djing for 45min to 1hr, and have real djs open and close. Pure promotion. I dont like it, but if your the guy opening or closing, you would accept it.


ya id be a bit salty if i was making say 250 a night really mixn and cuttin my ass off to keep the energy high and some dude walked in and played an ipod for an hour and walked out with 10 Gs
Culprit 9:23 PM - 18 November, 2009
Quote:
Quote:
Just a stab in the dark, but, they probably dont mention that these dj's are probably only djing for 45min to 1hr, and have real djs open and close. Pure promotion. I dont like it, but if your the guy opening or closing, you would accept it.


ya id be a bit salty if i was making say 250 a night really mixn and cuttin my ass off to keep the energy high and some dude walked in and played an ipod for an hour and walked out with 10 Gs


Well just think in 5 years they will be the next mc hammer or vanilla ice.. just sayin
Flipsta 9:26 PM - 18 November, 2009
why did I bother actually learning skills and caring about the art of DJing? Oh ya...cause when I started it was 2 Technics Turntables, a mixer, and vinyl. These people are embarrassing....
sacrilicious 9:28 PM - 18 November, 2009
One of the best parts of the article was something along the lines of "you know, if there's a one or two second pause between songs then it makes it more intimate."
Joshua Carl 9:38 PM - 18 November, 2009
Quote:
One of the best parts of the article was something along the lines of "you know, if there's a one or two second pause between songs then it makes it more intimate."


that is fantastic.

see, Ive always thought when a DJ used the word "intimate" it meant
small-ass-club
Culprit 10:37 PM - 18 November, 2009
Quote:
Quote:
One of the best parts of the article was something along the lines of "you know, if there's a one or two second pause between songs then it makes it more intimate."


that is fantastic.

see, Ive always thought when a DJ used the word "intimate" it meant
small-ass-club


It does!
DJkahar aka Skyscraper 11:40 PM - 18 November, 2009
Quote:
(a source says that Ronson’s rate has dropped to $15,000 postbreakup).

Wow how can she even survive on that now??

I don't even recognize any of these freakin names their talkin about. I feel for all you DJ's on the east and west coast. Mad frustrating.
Joshua Carl 11:46 PM - 18 November, 2009
It was bad enough when they were paying W-Class celebrities just to host a night, or be in the building...

IE,
Schmedlap, the 1st nephew from Wife Swap will be hosting the Halloween party.
($5k)

who... what? who cares....

and the wavie in the corner gets 125 minus his 75. drink tab. complete with
moments of "intamacy" and his computer crashing from limewire every hour.
Dj Shamann 12:41 AM - 19 November, 2009
Next time some asshole from some small town chirps in and says "If you're losing a gig to an Ipod Dj that says something about your skills..."

Show them this thread.


Quote:
Richards insists DJing is a sideline. “I’m considered a model, you know, to me at least,” she muses, noting that she paints and is working on a jewelry line. “I [DJ] for fun.......



....But I charge 10 grand for it, and even then you'll have to clear it with my agent, manager, publicist, stylist and dog walker first. Tee hee!


Quote:


Being a DJ used to take a lot of dedication—now all it requires is a little computer savvy



They obviously haven't read some of the threads on these boards before.

;p
DJMark 2:44 AM - 19 November, 2009
Since "DJ-ing" originally started out largely as Musicians Union-busting, I have to admit there's a certain perverse symmetry to the idea of celebrities (or their offspring) displacing $200-a-night DJ's for $10,000 or more.
freshtodeath 2:25 PM - 19 November, 2009
The bigger story to this picture is Richards for example is DJing the "normal" clubs that most would frequent. The clientele are super imposed, filthy rich cock suckers that don't really care about the music or skill set. She fits perfectly in that demographic.
DJ Benny B NYC 3:29 PM - 19 November, 2009
Quote:
The bigger story to this picture is Richards for example is DJing the "normal" clubs that most would frequent. The clientele are super imposed, filthy rich cock suckers that don't really care about the music or skill set. She fits perfectly in that demographic.

and her father is keith richards she has millions. i hope she is donating some of that money
Joshua Carl 3:50 PM - 19 November, 2009
"why make trillions, when you can make.... billions"
freshtodeath 3:59 PM - 19 November, 2009
Quote:
The bigger story to this picture is Richards for example is *NOT* DJing the "normal" clubs that most would frequent. The clientele are super imposed, filthy rich cock suckers that don't really care about the music or skill set. She fits perfectly in that demographic.
Dj Shamann 7:04 PM - 19 November, 2009
Quote:
The bigger story to this picture is Richards for example is DJing the "normal" clubs that most would frequent. The clientele are super imposed, filthy rich cock suckers that don't really care about the music or skill set. She fits perfectly in that demographic.




That's not true, some of us actually do play those kinds of spots working years to get to that level only to have these assholes come in and make a joke out of what we do. Some of the lower tier clubs trying to fit in will break the bank trying to get one of these clowns in for status rather than going for talent who loves, lives and actually eats from these gigs.

I've played the same venue as many of the names being tossed around in the thread/article.

I actually bit my tongue about Samantha Ronson for like a year now because I don't choose to get into all that mudslinging, I don't even know her, she definitely doesn't know me so it was pointless. but after reading shit like this, it's not like i'll be hurting her pockets anyway. I played the night after her at one of our more mature spots only to find out this tart showed up with nothing, spent quite a bit of time powdering her nose in her dressing room, only to come out and stand in front of a ghost set for two hours while the soundman played the satellite system. And no Li Lo wasn't there, but you can still guess what Dj XM Radio was paid.

Another spot where a long time friend worked at, I had been talking to her about getting in, not by any means the kind of place Freshtodeath is describing (I've played way higher end) and she said she had been trying to make it happen but right now the boss was trying their celebrity thing, Paris fucking Hilton Dj'd there. Ipod, gigantic gaps between Be Faithful and other tracks of the like, all in all my friend said the worst thing she had ever heard.

I don't know where some of you guys are playing, but this is happening everywhere, not just the super secret billionaire clubs.
Dj-M.Bezzle 7:08 PM - 19 November, 2009
lol the clubs in my area are struggling to come up with the 250 a night to cover the local DJ theres no way there comming upwith the money to get a "celeb" to come dj here lol
Dj Shamann 7:14 PM - 19 November, 2009
I'm not crying into my cornflakes either saying "whoast me". I've grown to accept this over the years and kept it moving, but honestly when I see shit like "I'm not even a Dj, I do this for fun, but you gotta pay me 10 grand to do it" and other shit it makes me feel sad about something I loved from 7 years old, started doing at 10 and dedicated my life too watching some of the other greats bring us to such high levels of legitimacy as an artform only to see these brats piss all over that legacy and get away with it too because of who their daddies are.

NORMALLY it would actually give me motivation to say fuck this, and start making some noise about it but too many of our own kind have assimilated to this big celeb scene in hopes they can cash in, but little do they know it ain't gonna happen. We're definitely not innocent in all of this.
Dj Shamann 7:17 PM - 19 November, 2009
Quote:
lol the clubs in my area are struggling to come up with the 250 a night to cover the local DJ theres no way there comming upwith the money to get a "celeb" to come dj here lol



To be honest, I'd almost rather live in an area like that. LOL at least everyone knows where they stand, and probably makes them work a little harder.
Dj-M.Bezzle 7:22 PM - 19 November, 2009
Quote:
I'm not crying into my cornflakes either saying "whoast me". I've grown to accept this over the years and kept it moving, but honestly when I see shit like "I'm not even a Dj, I do this for fun, but you gotta pay me 10 grand to do it" and other shit it makes me feel sad about something I loved from 7 years old, started doing at 10 and dedicated my life too watching some of the other greats bring us to such high levels of legitimacy as an artform only to see these brats piss all over that legacy and get away with it too because of who their daddies are.

NORMALLY it would actually give me motivation to say fuck this, and start making some noise about it but too many of our own kind have assimilated to this big celeb scene in hopes they can cash in, but little do they know it ain't gonna happen. We're definitely not innocent in all of this.


my largest regret about djing is that i wasnt doing it when it acutually stood for what i percieve it to be
Joshua Carl 7:56 PM - 19 November, 2009
From the few people I know that saw him live, Tommy Lee was the same kinda horseshit...
djbigboy 8:00 PM - 19 November, 2009
Ha - I opened for Tommy Lee and Mix Master Mike - same night - talk about a huge difference in dj skills....Tommy Lee had a dj with him. They split the headphone jack into lines for 2 headphones....Tommy Lee messed with the knobs and the other guy did the actual mixing. He wasn't bad, but Tommy Lee literally just turned knobs and put his hands in the air....well, and the cool thing was, Tommy Lee got on the drums mid set and tore it up...I admit I liked that, but the djing part I did not.
freshtodeath 2:39 PM - 20 November, 2009
Quote:

That's not true, some of us actually do play those kinds of spots working years to get to that level only to have these assholes come in and make a joke out of what we do. Some of the lower tier clubs trying to fit in will break the bank trying to get one of these clowns in for status rather than going for talent who loves, lives and actually eats from these gigs.

I've played the same venue as many of the names being tossed around in the thread/article.

I actually bit my tongue about Samantha Ronson for like a year now because I don't choose to get into all that mudslinging, I don't even know her, she definitely doesn't know me so it was pointless. but after reading shit like this, it's not like i'll be hurting her pockets anyway. I played the night after her at one of our more mature spots only to find out this tart showed up with nothing, spent quite a bit of time powdering her nose in her dressing room, only to come out and stand in front of a ghost set for two hours while the soundman played the satellite system. And no Li Lo wasn't there, but you can still guess what Dj XM Radio was paid.

Another spot where a long time friend worked at, I had been talking to her about getting in, not by any means the kind of place Freshtodeath is describing (I've played way higher end) and she said she had been trying to make it happen but right now the boss was trying their celebrity thing, Paris fucking Hilton Dj'd there. Ipod, gigantic gaps between Be Faithful and other tracks of the like, all in all my friend said the worst thing she had ever heard.

I don't know where some of you guys are playing, but this is happening everywhere, not just the super secret billionaire clubs.



Lots of hate but I dont blame you. Sam Ronson sucks but I've seen her many times (5 or more) and she does not "ghost" her sets.

Point is, its all about who you know in this game (and it sucks). Richards grew up in household of stardom and became a model turned DJ. In reality its way more appealing for a brand like Gucci who is throwing a huge fashion launch in St. Barths to hire her than a "Dj Shamman". They automatically associate her as a star and don't really care what she sounds like.

You can check the whole roster of all the DJs mentioned in this article here www.ttamgt.com
Joshua Carl 2:48 PM - 20 November, 2009
"true talent"

oh, the sweet irony.

funny, theres more focus on all their modeling pictures then what they actually do as djs.
DJ Benny B NYC 3:02 PM - 20 November, 2009

there are some good djs on there along with the scrubs. like equal, scram jones
freshtodeath 3:23 PM - 20 November, 2009
Quote:

there are some good djs on there along with the scrubs. like equal, scram jones


ha! equal is cool
jprime 4:00 PM - 20 November, 2009
1. Visit 'Worst Experience Ever while DJing" thread
2. Apply each post to $10,000 DJ in one night
3. Profit.
Dj-M.Bezzle 4:17 PM - 20 November, 2009
Quote:
1. Visit 'Worst Experience Ever while DJing" thread
2. Apply each post to $10,000 DJ in one night
3. Profit.



woah woah woah what was # 2 again *pulls out pen and notebook*
maestromind 1:53 AM - 21 November, 2009
A while ago I was visiting my friends in NYC and we wound up at a lounge that had one of these debutante djs - standing next to her pink laptop and watching the automix with glazed over eyes while sipping a drink in a glass that was wider than her waist.
Fortunately I was pretty gone by that point so it was more surreal than sickening. I would never imagine this breed would actually get a residence or even open at a real club.
Dj Shamann 4:08 PM - 21 November, 2009
Quote:



Lots of hate but I dont blame you. Sam Ronson sucks but I've seen her many times (5 or more) and she does not "ghost" her sets.


I'm sorry but I don't get where you get hate from my statement since I basically pointed out that for a year i didn't even care to say anything. if I was burning with hate I would've been here the next day waiting to tell the whole class, but it didn't seem relevant at the time. But yes, she did ghost her set that night, I don't care how many times you've seen her.



Quote:
Point is, its all about who you know in this game (and it sucks). Richards grew up in household of stardom and became a model turned DJ


Um yeah.... that was my point all along.

Quote:
it makes me feel sad about something I loved from 7 years old, started doing at 10 and dedicated my life too watching some of the other greats bring us to such high levels of legitimacy as an artform only to see these brats piss all over that legacy and get away with it too because of who their daddies are.



I've said it in this thread and many others. Which is why i also said ..

Quote:
Next time some asshole from some small town chirps in and says "If you're losing a gig to an Ipod Dj that says something about your skills..."

Show them this thread.



I say that because there's always some goober who doesn't see what we see in larger markets. Saying things like the ipod statement I just metioned, but they're talking from small towns with 5 other Dj's as opposed to where we're talking from where there's a lot more involved.


Quote:
In reality its way more appealing for a brand like Gucci who is throwing a huge fashion launch in St. Barths to hire her than a "Dj Shamman". They automatically associate her as a star and don't really care what she sounds like.




Thanks for stating the obvious as if I'm not based in reality (event though you're only regurgitating my points back to me) but...now we're talking about huge Gucci bashes in St Barths? That's not at all what I was talking about, I'm talking about regular clubs. They can have that shit, PVD, AVH all those big guys are the ones who would normally be choice for those kinds of Gucci money parties anyway and that's all good... what's the difference to us?

But when you've got these already rich posers playing clubs for a fad while decent Dj's who have built their careers on the shit are forced to look elsewhere, it's a complete joke and is probably the reason I just stopped caring years ago.

I know why Richards got her gig, i know why Paris Hilton was allowed to play the gig I mentioned, that doesn't mean I can't shake my head when i hear shit like "I do this for fun... but you have to pay me ten grand to do it"

It's obviously not for fun, i was poking holes in her statement... see it now?

But like I said, so you don't think I'm getting all up in your face (trust me I'm not) I think we're all part of the problem ourselves at times. Too many Dj's trying to assimilate in hopes of catching a shooting star, rather than actually doing something about it. If the only thing different from Paris Hilton's set and a "real dj's" (minus the akward pauses) is that she used an ipod and the other guy used turntables, then yeah there's not much room to complain about it from that guys stand point (in terms of paint by number sets that anybody can just download vs. creating something different)

10 years ago I probably would've been more defiant, but the more I saw other Dj's just shrug and say "If you can't beat 'em.." I stopped caring. Which is funny because 10 years later we have the internet and other things that make it far easier to be heard yet we do nothing.

Ah well, this is all just banter, excuse me while I go back to being a sheep
;p
O.B.1 7:38 PM - 21 November, 2009
baa baa black sheep, have you any pull?
JFelluss 9:38 AM - 6 April, 2010
yo dudes...im mentioned in the article but dont hurt me, im one of the good guys...
JFelluss 9:51 AM - 6 April, 2010
also note that on my interview i wasnt really hating, i actually talked a lot about how the celebrity aspect opened up a new pay bracket that hopefully some of us can slide into...now all i need is a reality star girlfriend...somebody call omarosa!! of course none of that gets mentioned because before i even talked to her i was gonna be painted the ol salty veteran... which im really not..

and ps i do go to a lot of those parties and yes many of the djs are terrible.

peace dudes!

-J
www.jessefelluss.com
JFelluss 10:05 AM - 6 April, 2010
so i just went back and checked out some of the posts...u guys have some great points..;how about this? we establish different names for djing like eskimos have for snow...like this guy is podcasting, or playlisting, or in-storing, lounge tracking, celebrity coat-tail riding (which i would gladly do for 10 g a night), musically licking another persons butthole for money...(can u tell ive done it before?) whatever...but the word DJ needs to be saved for those moments when u are just zoned out and the crowd is rockin and its all happening..and your adding some skill and some flavor...and its all the songs you like...dialed in....that should be called djing, everything else should have another name

at the end of the day it sucks when people come take ur money, but thats life, you gotta adapt with the times or do something to change them...im goin with production PLUG ME!

www.nuepourn.com

id rather put my foot in omarosas ass than date her
JFelluss 10:21 AM - 6 April, 2010
i guess i should do this to...

www.facebook.com

twitter.com

get at me!
JFelluss 10:25 AM - 6 April, 2010
i dont know why it made the links look like that but both are /jessefelluss
dj_KaSE 1:37 PM - 6 April, 2010
Pop culture. Gotta love it.

I agree that this is nuts.
Chad S. 8:00 PM - 6 April, 2010
I just got an idea.
O.B.1 8:06 PM - 6 April, 2010
enlighten us Chad...
Dj-M.Bezzle 8:08 PM - 6 April, 2010
Quote:


I agree that this is nuts.

Quote:
I just got an idea.



i dnt wanna know
dj_KaSE 8:13 PM - 6 April, 2010
Quote:
I just got an idea.


No auto-sync?
oldsportish1 9:33 PM - 26 October, 2012
This is a phenomenon that is actually evident everywhere and in everything in a society well within the grips of celebrity culture. It's the very system we are living in that is the problem. It's not the fault of the customers, they just go because of several reasons 1) hot girls go to events where celebrities are 2) the girls go to be seen or to feel special or someone they have been told is special 3) celebrity culture has taught people that because someone (usually mediocre) has been in a movie that that makes them special.. etc. Customers can't say "this is wack" because they want to be part of a scene.. people haven't been taught by their culture to appreciate quality because they don't think for themselves.. they just go where they think the action is.. which is where PR and celebrity culture tells them to go.

It's obviously grossly unfair, but if you want to stop seeing vapid playboys and sons and daughters of famous people taking the roles of people with far better taste and skill, you have to stop thinking that they are special in the first place. If I'm famous and rich and I have a kid, why is that fucking kid special?! He's only special in a society shaped by greed and profit, a society where we see the same fucking actors in all the same damn movies ... all because some ultra rich people own all the studios and $$ drives everything. It says so in this article itself -- the reason is because more people will come and the club will get a better name is they hire some kid of a celebrity.. who by the way if he or she has any talent at all is because they are so rich they don't have to work and just spend all their time painting and practicing djing...

The problem is a system that allows wealthy people to do whatever the fuck they want .. eat the 1%
Mr. Goodkat 12:40 AM - 27 October, 2012
we play music for crowds, it isnt that hard and 90% of u.s. crowds don't care. they want to get f#cked up and bang somebody or hang with friends.

i think most djs have built themselves into something they arent, which is very important.

dvs's were the nail in the coffin for djs period.
AKIEM 7:43 AM - 27 October, 2012
Quote:
we play music for crowds, it isnt that hard and 90% of u.s. crowds don't care. they want to get f#cked up and bang somebody or hang with friends.

i think most djs have built themselves into something they arent, which is very important.

dvs's were the nail in the coffin for djs period.


maybe, I just think crowds got dumber and dumber
Mighty Dragon Sounds 11:30 AM - 27 October, 2012
Quote:
Quote:
we play music for crowds, it isnt that hard and 90% of u.s. crowds don't care. they want to get f#cked up and bang somebody or hang with friends.

i think most djs have built themselves into something they arent, which is very important.

dvs's were the nail in the coffin for djs period.


maybe, I just think crowds got dumber and dumber


+1 with shorter attention spans.
popnwave 5:25 PM - 27 October, 2012
There have been shithead crowds since DJs first started supplanting live bands in bars and clubs. I think the best scenario is you have a night where you play what YOU like, maybe not in the biggest of places, but your crowd enjoys your progressive material. Then you have the gig that pays the bills, which you may lose a small portion of your soul doing, but it works.
SiRocket 9:43 PM - 27 October, 2012
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
we play music for crowds, it isnt that hard and 90% of u.s. crowds don't care. they want to get f#cked up and bang somebody or hang with friends.

i think most djs have built themselves into something they arent, which is very important.

dvs's were the nail in the coffin for djs period.


maybe, I just think crowds got dumber and dumber


+1 with shorter attention spans.


+2
Mr. Goodkat 12:55 AM - 28 October, 2012
Quote:
Quote:
we play music for crowds, it isnt that hard and 90% of u.s. crowds don't care. they want to get f#cked up and bang somebody or hang with friends.

i think most djs have built themselves into something they arent, which is very important.

dvs's were the nail in the coffin for djs period.


maybe, I just think crowds got dumber and dumber


they didnt get dumber, most of these people would never have the time or money to ever go look for/buy records, turntables and mixers, so these types would have never been able to dj.

i dont think models are gonna carry 100 lbs of records or go to the records store the day the hot records come out and fight over the last 2 white labels left of that weeks big record. its hard for me to even believe people used to have to maybe have 1-5 copies of a record in a given city. or maybe 100-500(or less) scattered over a given continent.

when you take that kind of exclusivity away, which is what burnable cds and downloading music did/later combined with dvs, you get crap. NOT that there werent crap djs back in the day, but there wasnt the availability to be so crappy so easily as there is now.

i was listening to the archives of my local station and came across this from 91. which may or may not impress anyone. but it was done with 2 decks and a basic phrase sampler, no ableton, no sp6, no rel mode, no sync. makes complaining for features in dvs's quite ridiculous.



www.jeffk.net
dj poisonous handz 1:36 AM - 28 October, 2012
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
we play music for crowds, it isnt that hard and 90% of u.s. crowds don't care. they want to get f#cked up and bang somebody or hang with friends.

i think most djs have built themselves into something they arent, which is very important.

dvs's were the nail in the coffin for djs period.


maybe, I just think crowds got dumber and dumber


they didnt get dumber, most of these people would never have the time or money to ever go look for/buy records, turntables and mixers, so these types would have never been able to dj.

i dont think models are gonna carry 100 lbs of records or go to the records store the day the hot records come out and fight over the last 2 white labels left of that weeks big record. its hard for me to even believe people used to have to maybe have 1-5 copies of a record in a given city. or maybe 100-500(or less) scattered over a given continent.

when you take that kind of exclusivity away, which is what burnable cds and downloading music did/later combined with dvs, you get crap. NOT that there werent crap djs back in the day, but there wasnt the availability to be so crappy so easily as there is now.

i was listening to the archives of my local station and came across this from 91. which may or may not impress anyone. but it was done with 2 decks and a basic phrase sampler, no ableton, no sp6, no rel mode, no sync. makes complaining for features in dvs's quite ridiculous.



www.jeffk.net

lovely shit.took me the f&ck back with revoked - pieces
AKIEM 7:55 AM - 28 October, 2012
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
we play music for crowds, it isnt that hard and 90% of u.s. crowds don't care. they want to get f#cked up and bang somebody or hang with friends.

i think most djs have built themselves into something they arent, which is very important.

dvs's were the nail in the coffin for djs period.


maybe, I just think crowds got dumber and dumber


they didnt get dumber, most of these people would never have the time or money to ever go look for/buy records, turntables and mixers, so these types would have never been able to dj.

i dont think models are gonna carry 100 lbs of records or go to the records store the day the hot records come out and fight over the last 2 white labels left of that weeks big record. its hard for me to even believe people used to have to maybe have 1-5 copies of a record in a given city. or maybe 100-500(or less) scattered over a given continent.

when you take that kind of exclusivity away, which is what burnable cds and downloading music did/later combined with dvs, you get crap. NOT that there werent crap djs back in the day, but there wasnt the availability to be so crappy so easily as there is now.

i was listening to the archives of my local station and came across this from 91. which may or may not impress anyone. but it was done with 2 decks and a basic phrase sampler, no ableton, no sp6, no rel mode, no sync. makes complaining for features in dvs's quite ridiculous.



www.jeffk.net



You seem to be talking about DJs here, I was talking about the crowds.
Mr. Goodkat 10:45 PM - 28 October, 2012
crowds are a direct result of bad djs. its like if you grew up eating nothing but fast food, you would think it didn't suck so bad. You might even think it was better than eating a proper balanced meal. crowds that i see rarely want to see a properly mixed sets with buildups and breakdowns, its just play pop song after pop song or one recognizable classic tune after another. there was actually a point where crowds wanted to hear stuff they had never heard before with a few big tunes mixed in. ah the days..
AKIEM 10:51 PM - 28 October, 2012
There is much more to it then bad DJs. Mater of fact I think the bad crowds came before the bad DJs. TV, radio, and Internet all play a roll in make dumb crowds, as well as just dumb people in general.

A good crowd will not put up with a bad DJ. Good DJs put up with bed crowds routinely.
popnwave 10:55 PM - 28 October, 2012
This plays into people bitching about big name DJs not playing their own hits in their sets, etc. If someone is playing LIVE I would expect that, but dudes like Calvin Harris, Boys Noize, blah blah blah who are doing DJ sets seem to get shit because they play OTHER styles and artists when they aren't acting as a LIVE act.

This is firmly put on venue owners and promoters who bet on the masses coming out based by the NAME on the event and not what that artists is actually doing that night.
AKIEM 11:01 PM - 28 October, 2012
^yeah but crowds started being shitty before that. For me it started when radio tv took complete control of 'programing'. I used to break records routinely, seldom happens now a day
Mr. Goodkat 7:52 PM - 31 October, 2012
Quote:
There is much more to it then bad DJs. Mater of fact I think the bad crowds came before the bad DJs. TV, radio, and Internet all play a roll in make dumb crowds, as well as just dumb people in general.

A good crowd will not put up with a bad DJ. Good DJs put up with bed crowds routinely.


i saw the evolution, the difference is that you could say, 'i dont have that' point to 200 records and they would be on their way. people were basically at the whim of the dj. now saying i dont have that leads to all kind of madness, breaking out the ipod/phone, why cant you download, the looks, the horror. you know 2012 dj problems.
sixxx 8:12 PM - 31 October, 2012
lol ain't that the truth.
SpareChange 9:37 PM - 31 October, 2012
Quote:
Quote:

the difference is that you could say, 'i dont have that' point to 200 records and they would be on their way. people were basically at the whim of the dj.



I miss those days...sometimes If somebody requested something i didn't want to play I would make them dig through the crates to find it, some would pull it out and I'd play it but most of the time if they didn't find it by the 3rd laundry basket they would give up and be cool with it.